You Are What You Shoot?

Regular readers know I like cars (and have a car photography website.) In the car world it’s long been an incorrect, I think, axiom that “you are what you drive.” That was running though my mind while reading e-mail from a reader about one of my magazine reviews of a digital SLR.

I always hearing hearing from readers and while most of my e-mail is supportive or people asking for help with a technical problem, on occasions I get an e-mail about equipment. One began, “I know you shoot with Pentax and Olympus cameras…” Well he was at least half right. If you  want to know what kind of gear I use and purchased with my own money—there are no freebies, at least not for me—click here.

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I though it would be a good idea to give you a glimpse behind the curtain: I am not employed, under contract, or personally sponsored by any camera, photographic, or software company. The ads  on this blog help pay for  the out-of-pocket costs that go along with keeping it operating. Any mention of equipment or software used to make photographs featured in this blog, my books or magazine stories does not constitute an endorsement of any specific brand of camera, lens or equipment. This is just the gear that I shoot or have tested and you may prefer to use something else that fits your style of photography or budget.

Information about the gear I use is included in my articles and blog posts because most readers (they tell me) like to know this kind of stuff. That’s also why I try to include exposure data. Ultimately I think you should use this information only as a guide and shoot whatever kind of camera you like and can afford. I strongly believe the attitude you bring to a shoot is more important than the equipment. The image above was shot with a Canon EOS Rebel T3 (I was reviewing for Shutterbug) and my alas discontinued Tamron 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 lens (at 13mm) with an exposure of 1/125 sec at f/8 and ISO 200. The 11-18mm lens was replaced with the SP 10-24MM F/3.5-4.5 Di II, which I haven’t tested yet.

When I review equipment I put myself in the position of a reader who wants to know how well the gear works. I’ve criticized cameras from all manufacturers because I’m not a fanboy of any particular brand. If I am biased at all it’s toward the truth, as I see it anyway, about a particular product and not based on its name or how many pros shoot it at the Super Bowl or how many celebrities use the camera. Few of us will get to photograph the Super Bowl and fewer yet are celebrities. All I want to know and tell you about is does the equipment work as advertised and is it a good value. That’s my only bias.

PS. If you have questions, just click on CONTACT at the top of this page and I’ll do my best to answer any photography questions that you might have.

Author: Joe Farace

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