Two Photographers, One Model, One Location
Mar13

Two Photographers, One Model, One Location

A great photographer once advised me to work with as few light control devices as possible. I try to do that because the less time spent working with my gear, the more time I can spend putting my subject at ease. If you give me a doorway I’ll use it as a prop. Doorways give subjects something to do with their hands as well as—I think anyway—provide a natural frame around the subject adding interest to the portrait. Image wascaptured...

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Using Soft Focus or Blur for Portraits
Jan12

Using Soft Focus or Blur for Portraits

When it comes to portraiture, you don’t always want tack sharp photographs. Blur and selective blur, when applied to an otherwise ordinary photograph can create a mood that fits an impression of the subject more than the reality but sometimes the distinction between  blur and soft focus gets confused, so let’s take a look at their differences. Blur: Blur can be caused by camera or subject motion and can be accidentally or deliberately...

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A Few Basic Portrait Posing Tips
Apr28

A Few Basic Portrait Posing Tips

One of the most important elements in creating saleable portraits is knowing how to pose your subjects. You may be able to photograph a beautiful woman but if her pose is awkward, clumsy, or just unattractive, it will reduce your ability to sell prints. And because often you’ll often be working with people that have not been photographed since their wedding or senior portraits, it’s important to develop an understanding of posing...

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Tips for Better Outdoor Portraits
May30

Tips for Better Outdoor Portraits

When working with a portrait subject—indoors or outdoors—I like to measure the light on both sides of a person’s face to determine the lighting ratio. There are all kinds of rules of thumb telling you what the ideal ratio is but Renaissance painters used a technique called chiaroscuro that featured ratios that would make some studio photographer’s hair stand on end but created art that has transcended the centuries. The “right” ratio...

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A Model Shoot in Micro Four-thirds
May06

A Model Shoot in Micro Four-thirds

Last week a photographer in Eugene, Oregon emailed me asking if it would be possible to try out the Panasonic Lumix GH3 in his studio for a model shoot. Since I haven’t used the GH3 in a studio setting and I was headed for Eugene I jumped at the chance. Besides the Lumix GH3 I brought the Lumix 12-35mm f/2.8 and the 35-100mm f/2.8 lenses. When I arrived at Bob’s studio and meet Meghan I knew we couldn’t go wrong. As you can see Meghan...

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Learning to See the Light
Oct23

Learning to See the Light

Light has four major qualities: quality, quantity, color and direction and the least expensive lighting equipment you can use to make portraits is the sun. It’s free and even on cloudy days  produces a wonderfully soft effect and it’s easy to use. Under most lighting conditions your camera’s built-in meter will give anywhere from acceptable to perfect exposures. Learning to see the light is not difficult but does take some...

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How Did You Make that Shot? Part III
Aug07

How Did You Make that Shot? Part III

For my first session in my home studio with Misa Lynn I used a bare bones lighting arrangement: A single Speedotron M11 head with a 32-inch round reflector placed (from a two light kit) at camera left was positioned at camera right with an asymmetrical setup selected from the 800-Ws Speedotron power pack.  For this first session the background was a Belle Drape grey muslin backdrop. Look for an in-depth test of this Speedotron...

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