Creating Maximum Depth-of-Field
Dec07

Creating Maximum Depth-of-Field

“A good photograph is knowing where to stand.”—Ansel Adams Other than shooting infrared landscapes, I’m not known as a landscape photographer. Nevertheless, many years ago, I developed a series of personal rules on the “what” and “how” for photographing landscapes that I still follow today. These four principles are not cast in concrete and are presented here only as guidelines for your own explorations in landscape...

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It’s Aspen Season: How I Photograph Landscapes
Oct09

It’s Aspen Season: How I Photograph Landscapes

“The lake and the mountains have become my landscape, my real world.”— Georges Simenon While it may be a oversimplification to say that anybody can make a great photograph in Monument Valley, the truth is that that the art of landscape photography often gets confused with the real estate business because of its emphasis on location, location, location. As a student at the Maryland Institute, College of Art I once attended...

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Shooting Impressionist Images with the Skink Pinhole Lens
Jul21

Shooting Impressionist Images with the Skink Pinhole Lens

“Impressionism is not a movement, it is a philosophy of life.” ― Max Lieberman The Skink Pinhole Pancake lens is different than other pinhole lenses in that it uses a modular design with  disks, zone plates or  sieves that can be installed between the retaining rings in the center of the lens. It’s constructed significantly better than Olympus’ 9mm f/8.0 Fisheye Body Cap lens although physically it’s about the same...

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Shoot like it’s 1996!
Nov04

Shoot like it’s 1996!

Today’s Post by Todd Abbotts If you’re old timer like me, you fed your first camera a steady diet of Velvia or Ektachrome or Kodachrome—all film types and each one as different as the shooter who was loading them. If you were on a budget, also like me, then you had the math worked out as to how much each press of the shutter would cost. I went back and looked, in 1996 one frame of Velvia cost me 54 cents from time of exposure to light...

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Infrared Photography in the Movies
Sep09

Infrared Photography in the Movies

Today’s Post by Joe Farace Whenever I’m asked to do a presentation about infrared photography to photographic organizations  I always kick it off with a questions that I was once asked: A reader once e-mailed asking “Why do you do infrared photography, when regular photography is already so hard?” The short answer, for me anyway, is because it’s fun. Sure it’s a bit more techy than traditional visible light photography but...

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Wordy Wednesday #226 “A Tree is a Tree is a Tree”
Sep07

Wordy Wednesday #226 “A Tree is a Tree is a Tree”

“I think that I shall never see, A poem lovely as a tree.”—Joyce Kilmer Silent film pioneer Mack Sennett once famously said that “a rock is a rock is a rock” when talking about why he was shooting his fledgling comedies in the village of Edendale, California that’s now part of Echo Park. His idea was that it didn’t matter where you were filming because a tree is just a tree not matter where it’s photographed. I like to...

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Infrared Season is in Full Bloom
Jun27

Infrared Season is in Full Bloom

First I would like to thank all who attending the sold-out Infrared Workshop, this past Saturday. Big thanks to Mike, Dorothy and Ed for attending. There will be another workshop in July and when the date is selected, I’ll have a post about it here. One of the things the workshop attendees enjoyed was trying out the various filters in my kit with their own camera. Here’s what we used and with any IR filter they require a tripod and...

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