Portrait Wednesdays: The Many Moods of Pamela
Sep20

Portrait Wednesdays: The Many Moods of Pamela

“Look, I’m not an intellectual – I just take pictures.”—Helmut Newton With Wordy Wednesdays running so many years I thought it was time for a change and inspired by Gary Bernstein’s book Burning Gold decided to see how many Wednesdays I could publish a different portrait of the same model, in this case Pamela Simpson. Over the next who-knows-how-many Wednesdays I’ll be showcasing a different image of her...

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Big Noise from Winnetka
Sep19

Big Noise from Winnetka

“Big Noise from Winnetka” is a jazz song co-written by composer and bass player Bob Haggart and drummer Ray Bauduc, who were members of a sub-group of the Bob Crosby Orchestra called “The Bobcats”. They also were the first to record it, in 1938. The other night I was watching one of my favorite movies, Three Days of the Condor, for maybe the fourth time and was struck by one scene showing a series of...

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Choosing the Right Light Modifier
Sep18

Choosing the Right Light Modifier

“The mind is like an umbrella. Its most useful when open.”—Walter Gropius It doesn’t matter whether you’re working with speedlights or monolights, one of the best ways to improve the quality of the light is by using an umbrella or a lightbank and each one has their own unique advantages and disadvantages. Your decision should ultimately be governed by one important rule: The closer the light is to the subject...

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Film Friday: The Konica Hexar RF
Sep15

Film Friday: The Konica Hexar RF

“Are you telling me you built a time machine out of a DeLorean?…The way I see it, if you’re gonna build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some style.”—Doc Brown in Back to the Future. Konica introduced the Hexar RF rangefinder cameras on October 13, 1999 and at the time was the first new M-mount camera body since the Leica M6 was launched in 1984. Alas this wonderful camera was discontinued October 2003, a victim of the...

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What is a Wratten Filter?
Sep14

What is a Wratten Filter?

“When you are a photographer, you work all the time, because your eye is the first camera.”— Patrick Demarchelier Many times, colored filters are often referred to by their Wratten numbers. The Wratten system was originally developed in 1909 by the English firm of Wratten & Wainwright when they published a bookThe Photography Of Coloured Objects. Established in the 1877, the company primarily made photographic plate...

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Portrait Wednesdays: The Wedding Portrait
Sep13

Portrait Wednesdays: The Wedding Portrait

The new book, One Face Fifty Ways by YouTubers Imogen Dyer and Mark Wilkinson is an idea book about portraiture using one subject—Ms. Dyer— and one photographer—Mr. Wilkinson demonstrating lighting, posing and other techniques to capture the many looks and moods of a single person. This is similar to the approach Gary Bernstein used with Kay Sutton York in their 1988 book, Burning Gold, that I mentioned last week. With Wordy...

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Infrared Portraiture Revisited
Sep12

Infrared Portraiture Revisited

“From the research that I’ve done it seems that the bright Arizona sun caused he pupils to be smaller which is where the dark area is. If I had been shooting in a darker scene where the pupils were more dilated I would have gotten darker eyes.”—Mark Toal One of the things I enjoy about our sister blog Mirrorless Photo Tips is the stuff I learn from other writers, especially Mark Toal. Mark’s recent posts of infrared images are...

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